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New Study Suggests Climate Change Might Make Siberia Habitable for Humans

New Study Suggests Climate Change Might Make Siberia Habitable for Humans

Researchers from the Krasnoyarsk Federal Research Center, Russia, and the National Institute of Aerospace, US have claimed that large part of Russia might be habitable by the end of this century due to ongoing effects of climate change.

In the latest study, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, the group of scientists revealed how the area might change during later part of 21st century due to global warming.

During the course of the research, the group used a total of 20 general circulation models and two CO2 Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios to find temperatures of the region at different times of the year. In case you didn’t know, the Asian Russia accounts for over 77 percent of the country’s total land mass while accounts for just 27 percent of country’s population.

Talking about the study, Elena Parfenova, from the Krasnoyarsk Federal Research Center said, “Previous human migrations have been associated with climate change. As civilisations developed technology that enabled them to adapt, humans became less reliant on the environment, particularly in terms of climate. We wanted to learn if future changes in climate may lead to the less-hospitable parts of Asian Russia becoming more habitable for humans.”

Interestingly the group found that even with mild climate change, the area will increase its habitability by 15 percent. “We found increases in temperature of 3.4 degrees Celsius (RCP 2.6) to 9.1 degrees Celsius in mid-winter; increases of 1.9 degrees Celsius to 5.7 degrees Celsius (RCP 8.5) in mid-summer; and increases in precipitation of 60 mm to 140 mm. Our simulations showed that under RCP8.5, by the 2080s Asian Russia would have a milder climate, with less permafrost coverage, decreasing from the contemporary 65 per cent to 40 per cent of the area by the 2080s.”

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