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New Study Reveals How Growing Demand for Agricultural Products Are Threatening Primates

New Study Reveals How Growing Demand for Agricultural Products Are Threatening Primates

Researchers have revealed how deforestation in order to keep up with the increasing demand of food and agricultural products might be resulting in increased risk of primates’ extinction. In the paper the researchers revealed that about 60 percent of primate species are facing the threat of going extinct with 75 percent of the primate population are already in decline as a consequence of continuous deforestation.

In the paper, published in the journal PeerJ, researchers said that although the deforestation might provide some short term benefits to meet the increasing demand for consumer goods, the  practice comes with significant environmental costs. According to the study, over 400 million acres of forest has been cut down by humans between 2001 and 2015. This resulted in biodiversity losses as well as spread of emerging diseases in the affected areas.

According to the researchers, the demand won’t go down in the coming years either. They wrote, “Growing global consumer demands for food and non-food commodities from primate range regions are placing primate populations at risk of extinction. These increasing demands have resulted in an accelerated global expansion of agriculture and of extractive industries and in the growth of infrastructure to support these activities leading to widespread primate habitat loss and degradation.”

The researchers revealed that the demand will be doubled by the end of 2050 which will ultimately lead to more deforestation in the latter half of this century. If we don’t take any action, a large number of world’s primate will go extinct in the coming years. In order to combat against the consequences, researchers urged government and international organizations to take actions to limit the ecological costs to meet our demands for commodities.

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